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Version 1.1 – Updated August 2021

Open vs. traditional classrooms

Overview

  • Influence: Open vs. traditional classrooms
  • Domain: Classroom
  • Sub-Domain: Class composition effects
  • Potential to Accelerate Student Achievement: Likely to have a small positive impact
  • Influence Definition: Open classrooms emerged in the 1960s as a response to more restrictive forms of classroom organization featuring rows of desks and a teacher at the front of the room. Generally, an open classroom provides a flexible space, enabling students to choose various activities and to integrate different learning materials into their study during periods of large or small group instruction. In more recent years, the term used more often is “innovative learning environments” and include multiple teachers with a larger number of students (e.g., 3 teachers with 90 students) in one larger space (often with breakout rooms, etc.).

Evidence

  • Number of meta-analyses: 4
  • Number of studies: 315
  • Number of students: 0
  • Number of effects: 333
  • Effect size: 0.00

Meta-Analyses

Meta-Analyses
Journal Title Author First Author's Country Article Name Year Published Variable Number of Studies Number of Students Number of Effects Effect Size
Evaluation in Education Peterson USA Open versus traditional classrooms 1980 Traditional vs. open classrooms 45 0 45 0.12
Unpublished Thesis Madamba USA Meta-analysis on the effects of open and traditional schooling on the teaching-learning of reading 1980 Traditional vs. open classrooms on reading 72 0 72 -0.03
Conference paper Hetzel, Rasher, Butcher, & Walberg USA A quantitative synthesis of the effects of open education 1980 Traditional vs. open classrooms 45 0 45 -0.13
Review of Educational Research Giaconia & Hedges USA Identifying Features of Effective Open Education 1982 Traditional vs. open classrooms 153 0 171 0.06
TOTAL/AVERAGE 315 0 333 0.00

Confidence

The Confidence is the average of these four measures, each divided into five approximately equal groups and assigned a value from 1 to 5 based on the following criteria:

  • Number of Meta-analyses
    • 1 = 1
    • 2 = 2–3
    • 3 = 4–6
    • 4 = 7–9
    • 5 = 10+
  • Number of Studies
    • 1 = 1–10
    • 2 = 11–50
    • 3 = 51–200
    • 4 = 201–400
    • 5 = 400+
  • Number of Students
    • 1 = 1–2,500
    • 2 = 2,501–10,000
    • 3 = 10,000–20,000
    • 4 = 20,000–100,000
    • 5 = 100,001+
  • Number of Effects
    • 1 = 1–100
    • 2 = 101–300
    • 3 = 301–600
    • 4 = 601–1,200
    • 5 = 1,200+
Confidences
Number of Meta-Analyses Number of Studies Number of Students Number of Effects Overall Confidence
Confidence Factor 3 4 1 3 3
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