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Version 1.1 – Updated August 2021

Help seeking

Overview

  • Influence: Help seeking
  • Domain: Student Learning Strategies
  • Sub-Domain: Meta-cognitive/self-regulated learning
  • Potential to Accelerate Student Achievement: Potential to considerably accelerate
  • Influence Definition: An adaptive process whereby a person seeks external support for an academic or mental health problem. In the context of schooling, help-seeking is regarded as a self-regulating and proactive strategy that enables students to rely on others to help navigate the ambiguity and difficulty of the learning process. Effective help seeking requires students to develop metacognitive skills (to think about their learning process) and a positive self-concept.

Evidence

  • Number of meta-analyses: 2
  • Number of studies: 83
  • Number of students: 0
  • Number of effects: 83
  • Effect size: 0.72

Meta-Analyses

Meta-Analyses
Journal Title Author First Author's Country Article Name Year Published Variable Number of Studies Number of Students Number of Effects Effect Size
Unpublished Thesis Lavery Self-regulated learning for academic success: An evaluation of instructional techniques 2008 Help seeking 62 0 62 0.60
Educational Research Review Dignath, Buettner, & Langfeldt Netherlands How can primary school students learn self-regulated learning strategies most effectively?: A meta-analysis on self-regulation training programmes 2008 Seeking help from peers 21 0 21 0.83
TOTAL/AVERAGE 83 0 83 0.72

Confidence

The Confidence is the average of these four measures, each divided into five approximately equal groups and assigned a value from 1 to 5 based on the following criteria:

  • Number of Meta-analyses
    • 1 = 1
    • 2 = 2–3
    • 3 = 4–6
    • 4 = 7–9
    • 5 = 10+
  • Number of Studies
    • 1 = 1–10
    • 2 = 11–50
    • 3 = 51–200
    • 4 = 201–400
    • 5 = 400+
  • Number of Students
    • 1 = 1–2,500
    • 2 = 2,501–10,000
    • 3 = 10,000–20,000
    • 4 = 20,000–100,000
    • 5 = 100,001+
  • Number of Effects
    • 1 = 1–100
    • 2 = 101–300
    • 3 = 301–600
    • 4 = 601–1,200
    • 5 = 1,200+
Confidences
Number of Meta-Analyses Number of Studies Number of Students Number of Effects Overall Confidence
Confidence Factor 2 3 1 1 2
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