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Version 1.1 – Updated August 2021

FaceTime and social media

Overview

  • Influence: FaceTime and social media
  • Domain: Technology, School, and Out-of-School Strategies
  • Sub-Domain: Technology
  • Potential to Accelerate Student Achievement: Likely to have a negative impact
  • Influence Definition: Various forms of social media are being used as pedagogical tools. They can also be used to assist in homework and seeking knowledge, but there can be privacy and negative consequences.

Evidence

  • Number of meta-analyses: 3
  • Number of studies: 72
  • Number of students: 122,808
  • Number of effects: 72
  • Effect size: -0.07

Meta-Analyses

Meta-Analyses
Journal Title Author First Author's Country Article Name Year Published Variable Number of Studies Number of Students Number of Effects Effect Size
Thesis Marker, Gnambs, & Appel Germany Active on Facebook and Failing at School? Meta-Analytic Findings on the Relationship Between Online Social Networking Activities and Academic Achievement 2018 Facebook and learning 10 0 10 0.08
Computers in Human Behavior Liu, Kirschner, & Karpinski China A meta-analysis of the relationship of academic performance and Social Network Site use among adolescents and young adults 2017 Facebook and learning 28 101,441 28 -0.16
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking Huang Taiwan Time spent on social network sites and psychological well-being: A meta-analysis. 2018 Social network use 34 21,367 34 -0.14
TOTAL/AVERAGE 72 122,808 72 -0.07

Confidence

The Confidence is the average of these four measures, each divided into five approximately equal groups and assigned a value from 1 to 5 based on the following criteria:

  • Number of Meta-analyses
    • 1 = 1
    • 2 = 2–3
    • 3 = 4–6
    • 4 = 7–9
    • 5 = 10+
  • Number of Studies
    • 1 = 1–10
    • 2 = 11–50
    • 3 = 51–200
    • 4 = 201–400
    • 5 = 400+
  • Number of Students
    • 1 = 1–2,500
    • 2 = 2,501–10,000
    • 3 = 10,000–20,000
    • 4 = 20,000–100,000
    • 5 = 100,001+
  • Number of Effects
    • 1 = 1–100
    • 2 = 101–300
    • 3 = 301–600
    • 4 = 601–1,200
    • 5 = 1,200+
Confidences
Number of Meta-Analyses Number of Studies Number of Students Number of Effects Overall Confidence
Confidence Factor 2 3 5 1 3
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